Exorcising a demon or two on walk 149

July 22, 2018

High Hartsop Dodd

High Hartsop Dodd, from Hartsop Hall.

The first Lake District walk of mine that I counted on this project — walk 1 (naturally) — took place on 19th July 2009, so more-or-less, yesterday was the ninth anniversary. Having come back from that holiday in the Lakes in 2009 with the plans to embark on this project (the first round of 214, anyway), all was then nearly derailed by the rather disastrous walk 5 on which I got badly dehydrated and for good measure had my camera nicked from my bag in an Ambleside pub, making that easily the worst of the 150+ days I have since spent walking in the Lakes.

Yesterday’s walk 149, however, was the first return to the territory of that walk and so a chance to reacquaint myself with a couple of the fells therein, High Hartsop Dodd (pictured above) and Little Hart Crag. And while this is never going to be seen as a classic walk, the surrounding area is very attractive and most of the paths of good quality. Add Arnison Crag and its view of Ullswater to the beginning and walk 149 comes well recommended. Read all about it and see more photos on the walk page.

New trees in Scandale

The rash of new trees in Scandale. Low Pike above.

As of today, then, I have bagged 157 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, therefore I have 173 to go. If plans pan out then I should reach the halfway point of the round (and the three-quarter point of the double round) in early September. My next walk is planned for early August — I think I have convinced Joe to come with me on that one.

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2 Responses to “Exorcising a demon or two on walk 149”

  1. George said

    Glad you exorcised the demon. I think that’s a fine walk, although I did it as part of s Dovedale round, going up Hartsop over How to Hart Crag, Dove Crag and then Little Hart Crag. High Hartsop Dodd is a memorable descent.

    The three Dodds rising in symmetry at the end of Ullswater is a defining feature of the lake and the Kirkstone Pass. I think the Nab must be a distant cousin too. Something about the way they all rise sharply and independently from the valley.

    Love your blog. Great source of inspiration. Keep them coming.

    • Drew Whitworth said

      Thank you George 🙂 Yes, that little part of the world, from the head of Ullswater down to Brothers Water and Kirkstone, certainly has few peers when it comes to natural beauty.

It's always nice to hear what you think....

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