View of Upper Kentmere

View of upper Kentmere from Green Quarter Fell — the scenic highlight of the walk.

It’s been eight weeks since I last ventured into the Lake District. In the intervening time, a combination of other responsibilities, a train line closure and — most significantly of all — pretty terrible weather have kept me away. But the weather yesterday, 4th March, was pleasant enough and I was finally able to move on with the project and undertake walk 175.

This took me up the Kent valley from Staveley, and bagged the two Outyling summits of Green Quarter Fell, notable mainly for the views of the upper Kentmere valley (as pictured here). Other than that it is not a very dramatic walk, but it is an easy and straightforward one.

Fox on Green Quarter Fell

The fox I encountered on the slopes of Green Quarter Fell.

Northern Rail’s utter shambles of a train service did its best to screw up my day but the walk was done despite them: that was the worst part. On the other hand, the walk did have the bonus of this fox, the closest I have ever knowingly been to such a creature: it sat down when it saw me, quite aware of my presence and presumably keeping an eye on me as it had cubs in an earth in the vicinity.

As of today, then, I have bagged 240 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, and thus have 90 to go. I certainly hope to be back in the Lakes before the end of March but it depends on the weather — and the trains, unfortunately. Until then please do feel free to have a look at the walk 175 page where there are more photos and a full route description, as usual.

The last walk of 2019

December 29, 2019

View north from Hare Shaw

View north from Hare Shaw

I did not know whether I would get an 18th and last walk in during 2019 but the weather yesterday, 28th December, was decent and I had the chance to get out to Haweswater and bag a few of the remaining Outlying Fells on walk 173 — the five I had left unattained in the Naddle Horseshoe chapter. Not the most exciting walk, but worth doing, as they always are. Read all about it and see more photos, as ever, on the walk 173 page.

In percentage terms I have now done more of the Outlying Fells than any other chapter — a big rise from a year ago — so time to get back to the centre of the District for a while.

The 1380' summit

The unnamed peak at 1380′, with the slopes of High Raise behind.

During 2019 I have managed 18 Wainwright walks and bagged 63 summits during this time. As of today I have completed 237 of the 330 Wainwrights in my second round and so have 93 to go. I hope not to wait too long before my next walk — early January I hope.

 

Fewling Stones summit

Fewling Stones summit. Don’t forget to look for the comfy chair.

The tradition of the September double-header has held on several of the years I have been doing this project — it’s often a period of decent and settled weather (essential, if committing to two days of walking) and it’s the final chance to grab something before term starts properly at uni. I left it late this year, but last week took my chance to grab walk 169 and walk 170 and it paid off handsomely.

Over two days, I walked around 25 miles and on the fells saw more deer (three) than people (none at all, even at a distance). In excellent weather, particularly on day two, I bagged no fewer than 14 of the Outlying Fells, finishing the Wet Sleddale Horseshoe chapter and bagging the Wasdale Horseshoe, Crookdale Horseshoe and (on the second walk) Seat Robert summits a second time.

Sleddale Hall

Sleddale Hall, a.k.a. Crow Crag

This is all fabulously lonely country, and often tough going underfoot, but put in the work (on a nice day…) and its charms may be revealed. And there’s the bonus of some Withnail and I moments too (like Sleddale Hall, pictured). As usual, many more details and pictures are available on the walk 169 and walk 170 pages.

This two-day orgy of Outliers means that as of today, I have bagged 227 of the 330 Wainwrights a second time, so have 103 to go. The next walk will be in October some time.

The Knott summit

The summit cairn of The Knott, with the Duddon Estuary in the distance.

Not all my walks are necessarily successful. Walk 167, done yesterday, didn’t really work out, thanks to the difficulties that ensued in getting from Foxfield station to the first summit of the planned day, The Knott (pictured). That and its neighbouring unnamed summit, both peaks in the Stickle Pike chapter of Wainwright’s volume 8, were intended to be only the first part of a walk that also took in Caw; but they turned out to be my only two summits of the day. The energy just ran out. Still, they were done safely and in reasonably good weather, so that’s something. Read all about it and see the pictures on the walk 167 page.

Caw and Walna Scar

View up to Caw (left) and Walna Scar

As of today then, I have bagged 212 of the 330 Wainwrights in my second round, so have 118 to go. I don’t have the chance to do another walk in August unless something unexpected happens, but hopefully early September will see me on one of the two-day walks I typically try to get in around then (because the kids have gone back to school and the weather’s usually decent).

Watch Hill summit

The summit of Watch Hill — Skiddaw behind

I have been ‘confined to quarters’ for quite a while, first because of having too much work to do and second, because of undesirable weather; first, a short heatwave, then days of thunderstorms rolling in on a regular basis. But things relented yesterday to mark the first day of August, so I got out and bagged some Outlying fells, namely Clints Crags and Watch Hill, on walk 166. It’s been February since I picked up any outliers but they still need doing; even after today there remain 49 to pick up in my remaining fells.

In Setmurthy plantation

In Setmurthy plantation

A decent, if unspectacular walk today; although I did get the route and public transport sorted out properly this time which made it a significantly better walk than walk 92, which got the same three fells but was rather a drag at times. Walk 166 is the better version by far. Have a look at its walk page for more photos, route details etc. as usual.

As of today then I have bagged 210 of the 330 fells on my second round, so have 120 to go. I’m about to start on my two-week summer break from work, so there should be more before the middle of August is reached.

Low Fell summit

The summit of Low Fell, loking towards Crummock Water

Early June 2019 has brought the fairly cruddy weather that is typical for the time of year in northern England, but yesterday, 18th June, promised bright clear conditions and did deliver them. So I used the opportunity to get out on wak 164 and bag a couple of the more peripheral Wainwrights, Fellbarrow and Low Fell, in the north-west corner of the Lake District. There is not much to these fells physically, but the views of the Crummock Water and Buttermere area are spectacular, and this walk also had a nice preamble, coming in from Cockermouth to the north along the valley of the river Cocker, and building up nicely to the ascent of the two fells after lunch. Read all about it and see more photos on the walk 164 page.

Crosshill

The ruin-with-a-view at Crosshill, on the northern slopes of Fellbarrow.

Somehow I feel I have entered the closing stages of the project but this is all illusion as I have at least two years’ worth of Lakeland walks to do yet. I have bagged 205 of the 330 Wainwrights in my second round and have 125 to go. I hope there will be another walk before June is out, though let’s see if the summer breaks out properly.

Burn Moor summit

Burn Moor summit cairn

Friday February 22nd saw temperatures round my home in Yorkshire that were ridiculously high for the time of year (20ºC or so). I had to wait until yesterday, Saturday 23rd, to get out on a walk however, and though the sun did continue to shine through the morning, a brisk wind kept the temperature well down, so visions of a fleece-less February walk were unfulfilled. Nevertheless, walk 159 was done in very decent weather for the time of year and this allowed me to rebag five lonely and hard-to-reach summits down in the south-west corner of the District, from the Whit Fell, Stainton Pike and Hesk Fell chapters of volume 8.

View from The Pike

View from the Pike. Caw and the Coniston fells behind the only other walkers seen today.

Worth doing, but a very long walk of some 17 miles, making it the fourth-longest of all the walks described on this blog. Read all about it, and see the usual crop of photos, on the walk 159 page.

As of today, then, I have bagged 190 of the 330 Wainwrights a second time,  so have 140 to go. The next walk should be in the first two weeks of March, while I am just about still a citizen of the EU.

Morecambe Bay

Morecambe Bay, from Grange-over-Sands station this morning

I’m not saying walk 158, which took place yesterday (5th February), was a poor one, but on a grey February day, the low altitude fells around Gummer’s How at the south end of Windermere do not have a great deal of visual appeal. The best views all day were of Morecambe Bay pictured on arrival at Grange-over-Sands station, as you see here. It rained from 1pm until the end of the walk, and so I got a soaking as well. Still, on top of Gummer’s How itself, I rebagged three more Outlying fells — Staveley Fell, Cartmel Fell and Newton Fell (North) — and have now passed the halfway point of that volume, 59 done out of its 116 index entries. As usual, have a look at the walk 158 page if you want more details and photos. Not to mention detail on the heroic public transport fail that is bus/train connections at Grange station.

Gummer's How

Gummer’s How, from near Simpson Ground

As of today, then, I have bagged 185 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, thus have 145 to go. Still sticking to my target of two walks a month until August I hope there’ll be a next walk around the 21st February. Probably still in the Outyling fells, as I do need to catch up on these.

Brant Fell summit

The summit of Brant Fell, looking south, with Windermere below.

Walk 155 took place yesterday as I type, 20th December, and like all walks done around this time of the Solistice, was grey, damp and rather gloomy. Nevertheless it was good to get out as there was a time when I thought the previous walk, on 2nd November, might end up being the last one of the year. But yesterday I did bag four more summits: the three in the School Knott chapter of the Outlying Fells, and then Brant Fell above Bowness. Read all about it and see more photos on the walk 155 page. The walk mostly took place along the last few miles of the Dales Way, which runs from Yorkshire to Bowness, so another nice feature of it was that there was plenty of good signposting. No one’s going to get lost on this walk.

Dales Way signpost

Follow these: there are plenty of them. This was one of my best-signposted walks.

Almost certainly, that was my last walk of 2018. As of today, I have done 174 of the 330 Wainwrights a second time, meaning I have 156 to go. 2018 contained 15 walks (if the two-day walk 152 is counted as one), and 43 fells were bagged, starting with Latrigg in January and ending with Brant Fell today. This is down on my yearly average for both walks and fells, but never mind. With more time coming up in the new year I hope to pick up the pace a bit. Meanwhile: have a merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, and if you’re out on the mountains, be sensible and stay safe.

Sands of Morecambe Bay

The sands of Morecambe Bay, as seen from Grange station

I have calculated that of all the walks done on this project thus far, today’s walk 153 was the one that reached the lowest altitude. Bigland Barrow, the first summit reached on the day, stands at only 630′ above sea level. And that was as high as it got.

Nevertheless this was a very good walk. In advance, I feared that it might be a bracken- or mud-choked agricultural trudge, but in fact it was an easy walk, all done on good paths and was accompanied by some fine views. So if you want a bit of healthy exercise on a fine autumn day, you could do a lot worse. Get all the necessary details plus more photos on the walk 153 page.

Bigland Barrow summit

The summit of Bigland Barrow, with observation post

As of today, then, I have bagged 168 of the Wainwrights on my second round, so have 162 to go.

I’d like to think there’ll be another walk before October is out — but then again it is the longest month of the year. (This is true, even if you do have to think about it…). As is always the case — let’s see how it goes.