The Knott summit

The summit cairn of The Knott, with the Duddon Estuary in the distance.

Not all my walks are necessarily successful. Walk 167, done yesterday, didn’t really work out, thanks to the difficulties that ensued in getting from Foxfield station to the first summit of the planned day, The Knott (pictured). That and its neighbouring unnamed summit, both peaks in the Stickle Pike chapter of Wainwright’s volume 8, were intended to be only the first part of a walk that also took in Caw; but they turned out to be my only two summits of the day. The energy just ran out. Still, they were done safely and in reasonably good weather, so that’s something. Read all about it and see the pictures on the walk 167 page.

Caw and Walna Scar

View up to Caw (left) and Walna Scar

As of today then, I have bagged 212 of the 330 Wainwrights in my second round, so have 118 to go. I don’t have the chance to do another walk in August unless something unexpected happens, but hopefully early September will see me on one of the two-day walks I typically try to get in around then (because the kids have gone back to school and the weather’s usually decent).

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Watch Hill summit

The summit of Watch Hill — Skiddaw behind

I have been ‘confined to quarters’ for quite a while, first because of having too much work to do and second, because of undesirable weather; first, a short heatwave, then days of thunderstorms rolling in on a regular basis. But things relented yesterday to mark the first day of August, so I got out and bagged some Outlying fells, namely Clints Crags and Watch Hill, on walk 166. It’s been February since I picked up any outliers but they still need doing; even after today there remain 49 to pick up in my remaining fells.

In Setmurthy plantation

In Setmurthy plantation

A decent, if unspectacular walk today; although I did get the route and public transport sorted out properly this time which made it a significantly better walk than walk 92, which got the same three fells but was rather a drag at times. Walk 166 is the better version by far. Have a look at its walk page for more photos, route details etc. as usual.

As of today then I have bagged 210 of the 330 fells on my second round, so have 120 to go. I’m about to start on my two-week summer break from work, so there should be more before the middle of August is reached.

On the descent from Steel Fell

On the descent from Steel Fell. Helm Crag on the right, Grasmere ahead.

The murderous heatwaves being reported in Europe have not reached northern England as such, but certainly the weather is very fine at the moment and there was little excuse not to go out yesterday and bag two more fells on walk 165, namely one of the two High Raises (the one in the Central Fells) and nearby Steel Fell. I did this walk slightly differently than the normal pattern; instead of being on the 06:45 from home I left at the leisurely time of 09:40 and it was 13:00 before I began walking at Dungeon Ghyll. Most of the route and even the choice of fells was an on-the-spot improvisation. But it mostly worked, although the haul up High Raise is a little dull.

View to Thirlmere and Blencathra

View to Thirlmere and (on right) Blencathra, from the summit of Steel Fell

Anyway, as usual there is plenty more informaion and photos on the walk 165 page. The walk also has the advantage of ending at one of the Lakes’ most pleasant pubs, the Travellers’ Rest.

As of today, then, I have bagged 207 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, leaving me 123 to go. I hope my next walk will be in around three weeks’ time, in mid-July.

Low Fell summit

The summit of Low Fell, loking towards Crummock Water

Early June 2019 has brought the fairly cruddy weather that is typical for the time of year in northern England, but yesterday, 18th June, promised bright clear conditions and did deliver them. So I used the opportunity to get out on wak 164 and bag a couple of the more peripheral Wainwrights, Fellbarrow and Low Fell, in the north-west corner of the Lake District. There is not much to these fells physically, but the views of the Crummock Water and Buttermere area are spectacular, and this walk also had a nice preamble, coming in from Cockermouth to the north along the valley of the river Cocker, and building up nicely to the ascent of the two fells after lunch. Read all about it and see more photos on the walk 164 page.

Crosshill

The ruin-with-a-view at Crosshill, on the northern slopes of Fellbarrow.

Somehow I feel I have entered the closing stages of the project but this is all illusion as I have at least two years’ worth of Lakeland walks to do yet. I have bagged 205 of the 330 Wainwrights in my second round and have 125 to go. I hope there will be another walk before June is out, though let’s see if the summer breaks out properly.

The valley of Threshthwaite.

The valley of Threshthwaite. The walk goes around it, starting with Gray Crag on the left.

Walk 163 took place on the mountains that surround the valley of Threshthwaite — pronounced ‘Thresh’et’, before you bring to bear your salva glands too enthusiastically. As the picture shows, it’s an attractive part of the world (and on my first round was where I saw the golden eagle, although sadly that is apparently no longer in residence). Three fells bagged, Gray Crag, Caudale Moor and Hartsop Dodd, the latter having one of the District’s most unsung views, a fantastic panorama.

Joe and Hartsop Dodd

Joe on the way to Hartsop Dodd

I had Joe with me, this being the latest in our tradition of late May walks together: maybe it will be the last, as he leaves school this year and so his holidays may change. Anyway, read more and see more pictures on the walk 163 page. As of today, I have bagged 203 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, so have 127 to go. Next walk in mid-June, hopefully.

A very, very Good Friday

April 21, 2019

View back to Fairfield summit

View back to Fairfield summit, from the edge of the crags to the north

A trip abroad has meant a gap of a month in my walking project, but the wait was worth it. Everyone enjoyed a glorious Good Friday on the 19th April, beautiful sunshine and a decent breeze on the tops to stop everything getting overheated. It would have been a crime to ignore it — hence walk 161.

But this walk was not just good for the weather, oh no — it includes spectacular scenery, particularly that of the north side of Fairfield. Many will be familiar with this fell from the famous Fairfield Horseshoe route but that simply avoids all the mountain’s best scenery; doing it from the other side this time was one of the best arguments yet for doing a second round. And there were four other summits bagged on the walk as well, including St. Sunday Crag; so plenty to enjoy. This walk gets five stars and is highly recommended — read all about it and see lots more photos on the walk 161 page.

Cofa Pike and St. Sunday Crag

Climbing Fairfield over Cofa Pike. St. Sunday Crag behind.

It would be great to get in another walk before April ends, particularly if this good weather is going to continue, but let’s see how it goes — I do have some work to do… Anyway, as of today I have done 198 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, so have 132 to go.

 

Borrowdale from Catbells

Borrowdale, from Catbells.

I have been hoping to do two walks a month whilst on sabbatical in 2019, but my first window in March didn’t get used thanks to a combination of crap weather and crap sinuses — you don’t want to know any more about either.

But today, 19th March, things opened up and walk 160 happened, as I was able to head for Borrowdale and bag three summits: High Spy, Maiden Moor and Catbells. The weather was definitely mixed — but this permitted some decent photography and nothing really wet got in my face. This was a very good walk, easy to access and not too strenuous while having magnificent views. I recommend it — so have a look at the further detail on the walk 160 page.

Upper Newlands

Upper Newlands. Hindscarth to right, Blea Crag to the left.

As of today, then, I have bagged 193 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, and therefore have 137 to go. Actually I’ve had a pretty good run recently: in the last 3 months, since 20th December, I’ve bagged 23 summits; prior to that it took me six months to bag the same number. So I’m fulfilling my promise to pick up the pace. But no more for a month now — I can’t do it, I’m away, thousands of miles away. The earliest I’ll get back to the Lakes is around the Easter weekend. But it’ll happen. Of course.

Burn Moor summit

Burn Moor summit cairn

Friday February 22nd saw temperatures round my home in Yorkshire that were ridiculously high for the time of year (20ºC or so). I had to wait until yesterday, Saturday 23rd, to get out on a walk however, and though the sun did continue to shine through the morning, a brisk wind kept the temperature well down, so visions of a fleece-less February walk were unfulfilled. Nevertheless, walk 159 was done in very decent weather for the time of year and this allowed me to rebag five lonely and hard-to-reach summits down in the south-west corner of the District, from the Whit Fell, Stainton Pike and Hesk Fell chapters of volume 8.

View from The Pike

View from the Pike. Caw and the Coniston fells behind the only other walkers seen today.

Worth doing, but a very long walk of some 17 miles, making it the fourth-longest of all the walks described on this blog. Read all about it, and see the usual crop of photos, on the walk 159 page.

As of today, then, I have bagged 190 of the 330 Wainwrights a second time,  so have 140 to go. The next walk should be in the first two weeks of March, while I am just about still a citizen of the EU.

Morecambe Bay

Morecambe Bay, from Grange-over-Sands station this morning

I’m not saying walk 158, which took place yesterday (5th February), was a poor one, but on a grey February day, the low altitude fells around Gummer’s How at the south end of Windermere do not have a great deal of visual appeal. The best views all day were of Morecambe Bay pictured on arrival at Grange-over-Sands station, as you see here. It rained from 1pm until the end of the walk, and so I got a soaking as well. Still, on top of Gummer’s How itself, I rebagged three more Outlying fells — Staveley Fell, Cartmel Fell and Newton Fell (North) — and have now passed the halfway point of that volume, 59 done out of its 116 index entries. As usual, have a look at the walk 158 page if you want more details and photos. Not to mention detail on the heroic public transport fail that is bus/train connections at Grange station.

Gummer's How

Gummer’s How, from near Simpson Ground

As of today, then, I have bagged 185 of the 330 Wainwrights on my second round, thus have 145 to go. Still sticking to my target of two walks a month until August I hope there’ll be a next walk around the 21st February. Probably still in the Outyling fells, as I do need to catch up on these.

Ullswater from the Brown Hills

Ullswater from the Brown Hills

I said last time I was hoping to get two walks a month in for most of 2019, but didn’t quite anticipate that January would see me attain this target before it was 10 days old. Nevertheless, the weather yesterday, January 9th, was far too agreeable to waste sat in an office so out I went to Ullswater. Walk 157 bagged me three fells, Gowbarrow Fell, Hart Side (now bagged in excellent weather on both rounds) and Stybarrow Dodd — and the rather good view of Ullswater that you see here. More pictures and a full route description can, as usual, be found on the walk 157 page.

Stybarrow Dodd summit

Stybarrow Dodd summit

Despite this early burst of activity in the year, I don’t really have another good chance to get out now until February, so that’s it for a little while. As of today, I have bagged 181 of the 330 Wainwrights in my second round, thus have 149 to go.